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Jan 112017
 

Getting married

Getting married or entering into a civil partnership is a very exciting time, but it’s also a time to start thinking about your finances and how things will change once you are married.

Whatever your situation was as a single person, when you get married you take on new responsibilities and so it’s a good idea to make sure both of you have a strong focus on your personal finances.

There are often big decisions to be made such as choosing a mortgage and deciding who’ll pay the bills (if you’re not already living together).  There are simple things that need to be done too, like changing your name on bank accounts and life assurance policies.  With the help of an independent financial adviser (IFA), you can make a structured plan that will help you cope with your finances as a couple.

We can give you expert guidance on a whole range of issues, from securing your assets outside the marriage, to helping with pension planning, or finding ways to spread to cost of your wedding.  In every situation, getting a little professional advice before you walk down the aisle is a good idea.

Questions you might like to ask us…

  • What’s the best way to organise our savings for tax-efficiency?
  • What are the implications of having our house in joint names?
  • Can we set up life assurance policies on each other?
  • How could we benefit from making pension plans together?

Your ISA Guide 2016/17

 

Don’t know your ISA from your NISA? Wondering what the difference is between a cash ISA and stocks and shares?

Read our beginners guide below and find the answers to your most commonly asked questions.

What is an ISA?

An ISA (Individual Savings Account) is a form of tax-free savings account designed for savers to hold cash or investments.

An ISA gives you a tax-free allowance each year. With a standard savings account, you are taxed on the interest that you earn.  With a tax-free ISA all the interest that you earn is yours to keep.

I keep seeing the term NISA?  Is this different?

ISAs have been around since 1999, but in July 2014 the government changed the rules as to how much you are entitled to save and the format in which you can invest.  These accounts are now known as New Individual Savings Accounts or NISAs, however to ease confusion we’ll still be referring to them as ISAs.

What is the 2016/17 ISA Allowance?

From 6th April 2016 the new tax year starts. The ISA allowance for the 2016/17 tax year will remain the same at £15,240.

The options for how to use your allowance are:

  • Save up to the allowance in a Cash ISA (you may only save into one Cash ISA however with NatWest you can also split the amount between a Cash ISA and Help to Buy: ISA)
  • Invest up to this amount in a Stocks & Shares ISA
  • Invest up to this amount in an Innovative Finance ISA (a new type of ISA for peer to peer lending)
  • Split your allowance between a Cash ISA, Stocks & Shares ISA and a Innovative Finance ISA (For example: Pay £10,000 into a Cash ISA and £5,240 into a Stocks & Shares ISA)

Are there different types of ISA?

Cash ISAs: A cash ISA is similar to a standard bank or building society savings account, the difference being that it enables you to earn interest tax-free.

There are various different types of cash ISA available, including instant access accounts and fixed-rate accounts.

Stocks and shares ISAs: This type of ISA can hold a range of funds, individual shares, government bonds and corporate bonds.  As with any stocks and shares investment this carries an element of risk and returns aren’t guaranteed – there is even a chance that you may lose money.  However, statistically, you are likely to achieve a higher return on your investment in the long-term as opposed to saving in a cash ISA.

You can use your allowance however you please – you could choose to invest the full amount in a stocks and shares ISA or place it all in a cash ISA.  Alternatively you can split your allowance between the two, it’s completely up to you.

Who is eligible for an ISA?

Anyone who is resident in the UK for tax purposes is entitled to hold an ISA.  You must be 16 or over to hold a cash ISA and aged 18 or over to invest in a stocks and shares ISA.

As the name suggests an ISA is for individual savers only, you cannot hold an account jointly with another person, or on behalf of someone else.

How much will an ISA cost me?

You don’t need to pay anything to open a cash ISA – although some accounts may expect a minimum deposit.  The most important thing is to find an ISA with a competitive rate of interest to give you the best return on your money.

With a stocks and shares ISAs you’ll likely incur a set up fee (usually a flat-rate) and often an annual charge (usually a percentage of your current investment).  You’ll also face charges for buying and selling funds so it’s important to look for a low charge if you are going to be actively trading funds.

How do I open an ISA?

ISAs are available from a range of providers including banks, building societies, credit unions, friendly societies and stock brokers.   Some accounts can be opened in person, others operate online only.

Use a comparison site to view the different types of ISA available from a range of providers.

Can I withdraw money from an ISA?

ISAs work best for savings over the long-term because of the compound interest i.e. earning interest on the interest, so if you can avoid making withdrawals this will help you to make the most of your money.

Some Cash ISAs will allow you to lock your money in for a certain period of time – and often these will give you a better rate of interest than easy-access accounts.  These are designed to avoid temptation as if you do make a withdrawal you are likely to face a penalty charge for doing so, and may lose out on any bonuses that the account offers.

However if you are using your ISA as a rainy day fund, there are going to be times when you need access to your money at short notice.  Look for an account that gives you the flexibility to do so without incurring penalty charges, the only downside being is that the rate of interest you receive may not be so good.

I already have an ISA but my rate has dropped. Can I transfer to another ISA?

Yes, you can transfer money in your ISA to another provider at any time but you should always check with your current provider that there aren’t any restrictions in doing so (i.e a charge).

In order to move your ISA whilst still enjoying your full tax-free allowance, you’ll need to fill in an ISA transfer form – your new provider will be able to provide this for you.

Is there an ISA for children?

Yes, there is. In 2011 the government introduced Junior ISAs to replace the now defunct Child Trust Fund.   The tax-free allowance in 2015/16 will be £4,080.

Any child under the age of 18 is entitled to hold a Junior ISA.  Parents or guardians can open the account and make regular deposits, however the money belongs to the child and therefore parents can’t make any withdrawals.  Children can take control of the account when they reach the age of 16, although they cannot withdraw any funds until they are 18.

Tax Tables 2017/18

 

Tax Tables 2017/18

 

The figures contained in these tax tables are based on those announced in the 2017 Budget and may be subject to changes as the Finance Bill passes through Parliament.

Please note income tax thresholds and rates are those applicable in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

V1 – 08/03/2017

 

Income Tax 

ALLOWANCES

 

Personal Allowances 2016/17 2017/18
Personal Allowance £11,000 £11,500
Income limit for Personal allowance(1) £100,000 £100,000
Transferable Tax Allowance for married couples and civil partners (2)   £1,100 £1,150
Dividend Allowance   £5,000 £5,000
Personal Savings Allowance (3)   £1,000 £1,000
Married Couples Allowance (MCA) 2016/17 2017/18
Maximum MCA (4) £8,355 £8,445
Income limit for the MCA (5) £27,700 £28,000
Minimum MCA £3,220 £3,260
Blind Persons Allowance 2016/17 2017/18
  £2,290 £2,320

(1) Personal allowance reduced by £1 for every £2 that adjusted net income exceeds the £100,000 threshold. Reduced to zero once adjusted net income reaches £122,000. (2) Available to spouses and civil partners born after 5 April 1935. The recipient must not be liable to tax above the basic rate. (3) Reduced to £500 for higher rate taxpayer and £Nil for additional rate taxpayers.

(4) Can be claimed by individuals born before 6 April 1935. Tax relief for the MCA is 10% and is given as a tax reducer. (5) MCA is reduced by £1 for each £2 of gross income above the income limit (£28,000 in 2017/18) but can’t be reduced to less than the minimum (£3,260 in 2017/18) 

 

TAXABLE INCOME

 

Thresholds 2017/18 Savings Income Dividend Income Non-Savings Income
Starting Rate(1) £0 to £5,000 0% n/a n/a
Basic Rate £0 to £33,500 20% 7.5% (2) 20%
Higher Rate £33,501 to £150,000 40% 32.5% (2) 40%
Additional Rate Over £150,000 45% 38.1% (2) 45%

 

(1) The 0% starting rate is for savings income only. If an individual’s taxable non-savings income exceeds the stating rate limit the 0% starting rate band will not be available for savings income.

(2) These tax rates only apply to the extent that dividend income exceeds the £5,000 dividend allowance.

 

  2016/17 2017/18
Trust Income Dividends Other Dividends Other
Interest in Possession 7.5% 20% 7.5% 20%
Discretionary
The first £1,000 of income 10% 20% 7.5% 20%
Income above £1,000 38.1% 45% 38.1% 45%

 

VENTURE CAPITAL SCHEMES

 

  2016/17 2017/18
Scheme Max Income Tax relief Max Income Tax relief
EIS £1,000,000 30% £1,000,000 30%
Seed EIS £100,000 50% £100,000 50%
VCT £200,000 30% £200,000 30%

 

 National Insurance

 

 

National Insurance – rates and allowances
£ per week 2016/17 2017/18
Lower earnings limit, primary Class 1 £112 £113
Upper earnings limit, primary Class 1 £827 £866
Primary threshold £155 £157
Secondary threshold £156 £157
Employees’ primary Class 1 rate between primary threshold and upper earnings limit 12% 12%
Employees’ primary Class 1 rate above upper earnings limit 2% 2%
Class 1A rate on employer provided benefits 13.8% 13.8%
Married women’s reduced rate between primary threshold and upper earnings limit 5.85% 5.85%
Married women’s rate above upper earnings limit 2% 2%
Employers’ secondary Class 1 rate above secondary threshold 13.8% 13.8%
Class 2 rate £2.80 £2.85
Class 2 small earnings exception  £5,965

per year

£6,025 per year
Special Class 2 rate for share fishermen £3.45 £3.50
Special Class 2 rate for volunteer development workers £5.60 £5.65
Class 3 rate £14.10 £14.25
Class 4 lower profits limit £8,060 per year £8,164

per year

Class 4 upper profits limit £43,000 per year £45,000

Per year

Class 4 rate between lower profits limit and upper profits limit 9% 9%
Class 4 rate above upper profits limit 2% 2%

 

Capital Gains Tax 

ANNUAL EXEMPTION & RATES

 

Annual Exemption 2016/17 2017/18
Individuals £11,100 £11,300
Trustees £5,500 £5,650

 

Main rates for individuals 2016/17 2017/18
Basic Rate 10% 10%
Higher Rate 20% 20%
Rates on gains subject to entrepreneur’s relief 10% (1) 10% (1)
Rates for individuals (gains on residential property) 2016/17 2017/18
Basic rate 18% 18%
Higher Rate 28% 28%

 (1) Entrepreneur’s relief is available on qualifying disposals up to a maximum lifetime limit of £10,000,000.  Gains in excess of this limit are taxed at 20%.

 

Corporation Tax 

Main Rate 2016/17 2017/18
20% 19%

 

*Since 2015/16, there has been a single unified rate for all companies irrespective of the amount of profit they make.

 

*Since 2015/16, there has been a single unified rate for all companies irrespective of the amount of profit they make.

 

Inheritance Tax 

TAX RATES

 

Tax Year Nil Rate Band (1) (2) IHT due on a chargeable lifetime transfers in excess of the NRB IHT due on Death on chargeable transfers in excess of the NRB
2016/17 £325,000 20% 40%
2017/18 £325,000 20% 40%

 

(1)The NRB will remain frozen at £325,000 until 2020/21

(2) When the deceased has been predeceased by a spouse who had not used all of their own NRB on their earlier death, the unused percentage on first death can be transferred to enhance the NRB of the surviving spouse on second death. The maximum percentage that can be transferred is 100% which would double the NRB available.

 

Tax Year Residence Nil Rate Band (1) (2) IHT due on a chargeable lifetime transfers in excess of the RNRB (3) IHT due on Death on chargeable transfers in excess of the RNRB plus any available normal (‘any assets’) NRB (4)
2016/17 n/a n/a 40%
2017/18 £100,000 n/a 40%
2018/19 £125,000 n/a 40%
2019/20 £150,000 n/a 40%
2020/21 £175,000 n/a 40%

 

(1)The RNRB is only available to offset against the value of a residential property that is (or has been previously) used by the deceased as their main residence and which is transferred on death to a lineal descendant, or the spouse or civil partner of a lineal descendant.   (2) When the deceased has been predeceased by a spouse who had not used all of their own RNRB on their earlier death, the unused percentage on first death can be transferred to enhance the RNRB of the surviving spouse on second death. The maximum percentage that can be transferred is 100% which would double the RNRB available.

(3) The RNRB is only available on death – it cannot be offset against lifetime transfers of a main residence. (4)The RNRB, which is in addition to the normal (‘any assets’) NRB, is set off against any chargeable transfers of a main residence before any of the normal NRB is used up.

 

MAIN EXEMPT TRANSFERS

 

Maximum £
Gifts to a UK domiciled spouse No limit
Gifts to a Non UK domiciled spouse £325,000(1)
Gifts to charities No limit
Gifts to political parties No limit
Annual exemption £3,000
Small gifts £250 (2)
Normal expenditure out of income No limit
Gifts in consideration of marriage (see below)
Parents £5,000 each
Grandparents and bride/groom to each other £2,500 each
Any other person £1,000

(1) This £325,000 exemption applies to cumulative transfers. It is therefore necessary to consider previous gifts and transfers to a non UK domiciled spouse in order to determine whether any of this exemption remains.  It is also possible for a non-domiciled spouse to instead make an irrevocable election to be treated as UK domiciled for IHT purposes.

(2) The gift has to be outright; not a gift into trust.

 

IHT RELIEFS

Business or farming assets may attract relief at either 50% or 100%, depending on the circumstances and type of the assets concerned. The relief can apply during lifetime and on death but if the relief is 100%, the practical effect is to make the transaction exempt.

  

Pensions 

ANNUAL ALLOWANCE AND LIFETIME ALLOWANCE

 

Tax Year Annual Allowance Lifetime Allowance
2013/14 £50,000 £1.5million
2014/15 £40,000 £1.25million
2015/16 £40,000 (1) £1.25million
2016/17 £40,000 (2) £1.00 million (3)
2017/18 £40,000 £1.00 million

1) From 6 April 2015, a Money Purchase Annual Allowance (MPAA) was introduced which applies to anyone who accesses their pension ‘flexibly’ on or after this date. The MPAA was £10K in 2015/16 and 2016/17 but reduced to £4K from the start of the 2017/18 tax year.

2) From 6 April 2016, the normal annual allowance is reduced by £1 for each £2 that an individual’s ‘adjusted income’ exceeds £150K. This is subject to a minimum annual allowance of £10K for individuals with ‘adjusted income’ of £210K or more.

3) The lifetime allowance was reduced to £1m from 6 April 2016. To counteract this reduction though, individuals can apply for ‘fixed protection 2016’ to preserve an entitlement to the higher £1.25m lifetime allowance provided (broadly) they do not accrue further pension benefits after this date. Individuals with total pension rights valued at greater than £1m as at 5 April 2016 can also apply for ‘Individual protection 2016.’

 

TAX CHARGES ON PAYMENTS   FROM REGISTERED PENSION SCHEMES

 

Charges Rates 2017/18
Lifetime allowance charge 55% – if the amount over the lifetime allowance is paid as a lump sum

25% – if the amount over the lifetime allowance is taken as income

Annual allowance charge Up to 45%
Unauthorised payments charge 40%
Unauthorised payments surcharge 15%
Short service refund lump sum charge 20% on first £20,000, 50% on any amount over £20,000
Special lump sum death benefits charge No tax charge where member dies prior to age 75

Beneficiary’s marginal rate where death occurs after age 75

Scheme sanction charge 15% – 40%
PENSION CREDIT

 

Guarantee Credit 2016/17 2017/18
Single Person £155.60 £159.35
Married couple £237.55 £243.25

 

BASIC STATE PENSION

 

SPA pre 6 April 2016 2016/17 2017/18
Category A £119.30 £122.30
Category B Supplement £71.50 £73.30
SPA post 6 April 2016 2016/17 2017/18
New single tier pension if got full qualifying years £155.65 £159.55

 

Stamp Duty Land Tax 

RESIDENTIAL

 

Band 2017/18 (existing rates) 2017/18 (Additional property rates)
Up to £125,000 Zero 3%
£125,001 to £250,000 2% 5%
£250,001 to £925,000 5% 8%
£925,001 to £1,500,000 10% 13%
Over £1,500,000 12% 15%

 

COMMERCIAL

 

Band 2017/18
Up to £150,000 Zero*
£150,001 to £250,000 2%
Over £250,000 5%

* Where annual rent is £1,000 or more SDLT will be charged at 1% for commercial land and buildings on values between £0 and £150,000.

 

Individual Savings Account (ISAs) 

ISA   CONTRIBUTION LIMITS

 

Limits 2016/17 2017/18
Overall Limit £15,240 £20,000
Lifetime ISA      n/a £4,000
Help to Buy ISA £2,400 (£3,400 in year 1) £2,400 (£3,400 in year 1)

 

JUNIOR ISA CONTRIBUTION LIMITS

 

Limits 2016/17 2017/18
£4,080 £4,128

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

What is an IFA?

 

What is an Independent Financial Adviser?

Mike Oliver Associates used to be part of the Sesame Network until the network decided to change their business model from independent to restricted (what does that mean? See below).  We felt strongly that in the best interests of our clients, we must maintain our independence, so we became a firm directly authorized and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority in 2015.

Broadly speaking Advisers are divided into one of two types.

  • Independent Financial Advisers.  IFAs are unbiased and can advise on and arrange products from any provider right across the market. They are required by the Financial Conduct Authority to give ‘best advice’. This means that an IFA is morally and legally obliged to act as the Agent of the Client rather than that of any product or service provider.
  • Restricted advisers.  These are the type of advisers you’ll often find in high street banks, or those who have chosen to specialise in certain providers’ products or certain areas of advice.  Their ‘restricted’ status means that they can only sell and advise on  a limited range of products, or from a limited number of firms.
So, if you’re looking for an adviser, try to ensure it is an
Independent Financial Adviser (IFA) if you’re looking for an unbiased recommendation.

 

If you’re going to get professional advice, check it’s from an Independent Financial Adviser. This is best if you’re starting out with financial advice, as it is important to identify why restricted advisers are restricted – some will be by product, and some will be by provider.

This terminology is a legal distinction, so ask them, “Are you an Independent Financial Adviser?” Don’t accept any hedged answers. Key Facts about our services and Guide to Our Services documents are designed to inform you as to which category an adviser belongs. Please ensure you are given a copy of such documents prior to any decisions being made.

Oct 282013
 

Later Life Advice

The University of the Third Age (U3A) invited Mike Oliver to give a talk on how to protect your assets and save money in the event of long term care fees.  If this is something that’s been on your mind, and you’d like a confidential chat with a fully qualified Adviser then drop in and see us, give us a call on 0845 4021757, or email mike@moaifa.co.uk.
REDUCING THE COST OF LONGEVITY

  • LONG TERM CARE
  • INCOME AND SAVINGS IN RETIREMENT
  • ASSET PROTECTION IN LIFETIME
  • ESTATE PLANNING UPON DEATH

Increasing life expectancy means that more of us are likely to face the issue of paying for long-term care for ourselves or our families. Government statistics indicate that by 2035, people aged 65 and over will make up 23 per cent of the UK population.

Currently, if you have savings or capital – which may include the value of your home – of more than £23,250, you will receive no support from the state towards your care fees.

We can provided advice on your options for the best way to pay for your care, while also protecting your assets to pass on to your loved ones.

For example, one option may be to place a property into trust, so that it becomes a protected asset and cannot be used to cover care home costs.

This also enables the person placing the property into the trust to keep the assets from being added to the beneficiaries’ estates and potentially becoming an issue on divorce or in relation to inheritance tax.

Mike Oliver Associates are directly authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority

Later Life Advice & Asset Protection

 

REDUCING THE COST OF LONGEVITY

For Later Life and Long Term Care advice we act as introducers.

Long term care is a hot news topic at the moment, with the government looking into how much individuals should be expected to contribute towards their own care should they need it, and how much should be funded by the state or local authority. Long term care means the provision of services to help an individual, often a senior citizen, with a chronic illness or disability who cannot care for themselves or who needs some level of assistance with daily practical matters such as eating, washing and dressing. This kind of care can be given at the person’s own home or in a nursing or residential home, according to the needs of the individual.

Funding for long term care is not straightforward, and there are several different ways it can be paid for.  Depending on the type of illness and your financial situation, long term care may be completely or partly-funded by the NHS or your local authority. To make sure you qualify, your financial means will be assessed, with your income, savings, pension and value of your property all taken into account.

Should you not qualify for funding, you would currently be expected to fund long term care entirely by yourself, so it’s a good idea to think about how you would manage this. Long term care can be paid for out of your income, or assets,for example by releasing equity for your home, or selling your home. Alternatively, you may wish to protect your assets and any inheritance you would like to leave your family, by taking out long term care insurance. Talking to an IFA or financial adviser can help you plan ahead and prepare for this, and help you choose an insurance scheme which is the most cost effective for you.

With the government currently responding to the Dilnot report on reforms to the funding of adult social care, this is an area that may be subject to change over the coming months or years. Once it becomes clearer what the government’s own proposals will be, it’s highly likely that insurance companies will start to offer new schemes to help people plan and prepare for their future. Your financial adviser who specialises in long term care will be able to advise you on latest developments and what is best for you.

Home reversion plans and lifetime mortgages are complex products.  To understand the features and risks, ask for a personalised illustration.

For equity release we can be paid by commission, or a fee of usually £600 or a combination of both.

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For a confidential chat call Mike Oliver direct on 01444 449222

The Later Life Academy

The Society of Later Life Advisers

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Welcome To:

 

home commercial mortgages pensions protection savings & investments wills & estate planning about us contact us Equity Release Long Term Care & Asset Protection

Contact Us

 
We’re on the high street, drop in and see us….

MIKE OLIVER ASSOCIATES
55 Perrymount Road,
Haywards Heath,
West Sussex, RH16 3BN

Call: 0845 4021757 or o1444 449222
Email: advice@moaifa.co.uk

“We grow our business by referrals, 
don’t keep us a secret!”

 

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and the Data Protection Act 1998.
Information supplied to us on the electronic form
will not be shared with third parties.

 

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Your Appointment

 

Tell us about your plans and dreams and we’ll work withchrysalis you to try and turn them into reality

 

What to bring with you

We have created this checklist to give you an idea of what information we will need to help you with your financial planning, and by supplying us with this information at our first meeting, we can start working on your case quickly.

  • List of goals for the financial planning exercise
  • List of specific questions that you want answered

ID/Residence

Proof of name – Current Passport or Drivers Licence

Proof of address – Utility Bill/Bank Statement – dated within the last 2 months showing name and current address

Possible Documentation Requirements:

  • Current Will and Trust documents
  • Buildings and Contents – policy and schedule
  • Life & Critical Illness – policy and schedule
  • Pension policy information
  • Investment information

Information required for Mortgages:

If Employed

Latest 3 months payslips

Latest P60

Latest 3 months bank statements showing salary being credited. Statements must include the bank’s name together with the applicant’s account number and name.

 If Self-Employed

3 years company accounts/self assessment tax returns

3 years HMRC SA302’s with Corresponding tax year overviews – these can be obtained from HMRC, they can be used as proof of earnings and tax paid

If you receive a PAYE salary from your own company then we would require 3 months payslips and latest P60 as well as above

Latest 3 months bank statements. Statements must include the bank’s name together with the applicant’s account number and name.

Additional Documentation

For purchases if not using equity from existing property we will need evidence of deposit funds

Latest Annual Mortgage Statements

For Court Ordered Maintenance payments – a copy of the court order

For Child/Working Tax Credits/Child benefit – Annual letters from HMRC confirming your payments for the following year and corresponding bank statements for the past 3 months showing the payments received

Latest Credit Report

Please sign and return the IDD explaining our costs and services we provide along with the data protection statement attached

 

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Why choose us?

 

Mike Oliver Associates an independent advisory firm authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

We are a multi-award winning company, recently winning an award at the Burgess Hill Business Parks Association and were awarded Sesame ‘Firm of the Year 2012’ and Mike Oliver, was Runner-Up for ‘Independent Financial Adviser of the Year 2012’.  The citation says MOA showed a commitment to the profession, excellent client service, high compliance standards, and effective use of technology.

Dulcie Brookfield currently heads up Business Development and Operations and was a finalist ‘High Achiever’ at the Venus Awards 2013 in recognition of her part in the company’s success in forging innovative relationship strategies and service delivery to enhance the company’s private and commercial business.

We are a progressive leading firm of long established national company of Independent Financial Advisers offering a comprehensive range of financial services to private clients and commercial organisations.

Our in house team of experts specialise in a range of financial products and we offer a huge choice.  For example, we have access to over 5,000 mortgage schemes. This means we will find the most suitable product to meet your needs, whether they are immediate, medium or long term.

Call or email to tell us your needs or arrange to come and visit us. There is no charge for this initial exploratory consultation.  Next we will analyse and consider your position and then:
•    Research the market as a whole
•    Recommend the best products and providers

Your home or property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

For mortgages we charge a fee of at least £600.  We will also be paid a procuration fee from the mortgage provider if one is available

Speak in confidence to us on 0845 4021757 or tell us your requirements here and we will get straight back to you.